To Viareggio

Every ocean voyage has its challenges and for each one there are usually one or two moments that stand out. On board Rosehearty, on her passage from Nuuk, Greenland to Viareggio, Italy, we seemed to have an abundance of these moments. At the time, as we persevered along our route, the challenges felt onerous. There were no freebies on the trip; every mile had to be earned. But in the end, both boat and crew succeeded, not without a few nicks and dings, but with an abundance of pride for having been handed a tough stack of cards and doing with them what needed to be done.


The following poem is dedicated to the Mighty Rosehearty, her passionate Owner Joey, Her stalwart crew and to Captain Markus, who when leaving Nuuk, drew coins from his pocket and offered them to Neptune


RoseMightyHearty


He paid his dues to Neptune,

Just as we left the dock.

The coins flew high in icy air,

And sank as quick as rocks.


“That's it,” we thought, “our tolls all done.”

We headed out to sea,

We didn't hear that tiny hiss:

"I have more plans for thee."


Perhaps it was the currency

Or other unknown slight,

But Nuuk to Europe will go down

As Neptune's trip of spite.


Each gate we passed, we paid our fee,

And hoped we would be done.

But Neptune rubbed his hands and said,

"I'm having too much fun."


In waves and wind we travelled south

Escaping hurricanes;

And then were handed fog and ice,

To ratchet up our pain.


We forked our payments over,

No sleep and pounds of stress;

The fines were taken willingly;

Neptune un-impressed.


Next came the big sou'wester

The bottom of a deepening low;

We slunghsot out into the high,

And my did that ridge blow.


Near Spain we got our fifty knots;

The sea grew large and wild.

The big one came just after dawn

And laid us on our side.


The rail went under water

As did the aft deck too;

But back she came to fight again

Rosemightyhearty true.


The Straits of Gib collected,

With 40 knots and traffic;

“We must be finished paying!”

But Neptune would not have it.


He'd other trials in store for us,

A little further on:

Square seas and lots more headwinds

Cabo de Gata -- for an eon.


The last wave was the biggest.

We dropped from a velvet sky;

Cement trough there to greet us,

Green water rushing by.


It buried all the foredeck,

The mast and hatch for crew

It smashed into the wheelhouse,

And flybridge windscreens too.


The tolls were getting pricey,

The crew was out of cash;

Would Lyon make us take a loan

And really kick our ass?


At first we did not think so,

The day dawned clear and bright

But soon enough the swells rose up

And rolled us through the night.


"Surely, sir, you must be done,

And happy with your purse."

The wind went aft, we breathed our gas,

It couldn't get much worse!


We all felt green and nauseous,

We gasped and spat and swooned.

Neptune curled with laughter,

And cackled like a loon.


“That must be it, no more pray tell,

Our credit's all used up.”

"Find a way, you have to pay

I'm holding out my cup."


Sand bar in Viareggio,

Would be our final gate

The swells they broke across it

And made us sit and wait


But patience is a crucial skill,

True sailors understand;

Use what nature gives you,

And then she'll lend a hand.


So pay we did along our route

With dollars, yen and kroner

The more we gave, the more he took:

How did we earn this honor?


The sea's a jealous mistress;

She seeks your whole devotion,

And often will remind you

With indifference or commotion.


We passed our test;

We paid in full --

No wining or complaining.

Neptune grinned a cheeky smile:

"I'm happy with your training"


And so to you, my fellow crew

On board Rosemightyhearty:

Let's toast the boat that kept afloat

And get on with our PARTY.


--Jonathan

10 Sept 2019

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The Best Laid Plans

 

About the same time Rosehearty was arriving in Nuuk, Greenland, Tropical Depression #6, 200 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras became Tropical Storm Erin. We had just finished a 21-day, 1300 mile Arctic expedition.  After weeks of extraordinary yet challenging cruising, the whole crew was looking forward to a few days dockside, a couple of days off and at least one night of 8 hours continuous sleep.  For the work days, the crew would tackle routine provisioning, fueling, and pre-sea checks.  Days off would feature sleep, hikes, and dinners out.  As we threw the heaving lines to the waiting line handlers, we could taste that first glass of wine in three weeks, smell the roasted musk ox and reindeer we wanted to try, and feel the soft embrace of our duvets and pillows on those mornings we would be allowed to sleep in.  This would be our last port of call before setting off for Viareggio, Italy, 3,500 miles away.

 

 

But as is often the case in large yacht programs, what you think is going to happen, changes, usually due to weather, schedule, boat or a combination of all three.  Within 15 minutes of docking, it became clear that our dreams of uninterrupted sleep were shattered.  The 15-foot tides and rough commercial dock would mean hourly monitoring of lines and fenders.  Within an hour of docking, we realized that the relatively short work list we had intended to burn through on arrival so we could have the rest of the day off would not even be touched because we would spend the next 7 hours shifting the boat forward and aft in order to give room to the commercial trawlers and ferries arriving in Nuuk to discharge their catch or their passengers.  And within 8 hours of docking, when we finally rested in our final position and could take a moment to review our preferred schedule over the next 5 days, we realized that the departure window as currently set – based on days off, crew arrivals and departures, and provisioning -- would not be feasible.  If we waited the 5 days to enjoy an orderly, restful turnaround, we would be departing into storm headwinds.  TD6, now Tropical Strom Erin, was strengthening and accelerating and headed towards Greenland.  

 

And so the crew smashed out 4 days work in 2, woke up every hour to adjust lines and fenders, took half a day off, and had Rosehearty ready for the 3500 mile sail to Italy by late afternoon, just 72 hours after our arrival.  We did get to try grilled reindeer and enjoy a glass of red wine.  A strong northerly surge was forecast for the first 24 hours, and though we would have preferred to wait for milder conditions to dock out, the 36 and 48 hr forecasts predicted a fast change to strong headwinds along our track and so we opted for an evening departure in to near gale conditions from behind, rather than waiting and risk running into gale winds from ahead.

 

The northerly winds were strong and cold as we made our way from the protected waters of Nuuk towards the open ocean.  Shrieking gusts funneled through the island passages.  Large ice bergs lay grounded in the shallows.  Having moved south from the arctic circle, our 22 hours of daylight were gone.  The sun would set at 930pm and we would have darkness until about 5am.  On the one hand, we welcomed the change, the chance to re-set our circadian clocks.  But eyeing the large ice bergs as we made for the open waters of Davis Strait and knowing that we would have at least 3 nights inside the ice berg limits, we would gladly have traded in our circadian reboot for a few additional hours of daylight. 

 

As I write this entry, we are about 48 hours out of Nuuk.  With 30 knots from behind and a 2.5 meter swell on the stern quarter, we rolled gunwale to gunwale for the first 24 hours.  We needed to get south quickly and so gybing down wind in bergy water was not an option, so we rumbled down on two engines, ticking off the miles quickly, with Greenland’s snow capped peaks fading on our port side.  We have crossed paths with numerous large bergs, some during the day, a few at night.  Last night just as we sailed passed Greenland’s southernmost point, we entered dense fog and picked up a large berg on radar about the same time.  It is quite un-nerving to be sailing with zero visibility at night with ice bergs around.  The large bergs present a fine echo on radar, but where there are large bergs, there are always smaller ones, in particular the debris field that larger bergs leave behind as they are buffeted by wind and wave and warmer temperatures.  Debris fields often have broken pieces the size of combi vans, mostly submerged, silent and undectable.   

 

From 2am to 5am the bridge and engineering teams were all on edge, having altered course to the south and slowed down.  It was not until we were well passed the berg and where we thought the debris field might be that we slowly returned to our rhumb line, picked up speed, and went to bed.

 

The fog has lifted and a favorable wind is on our beam.  We have deployed sail and are motorsaling fast towards the southeast, away from Erin’s path, away from the ice that stalks the coast of Greenland.  Welcome back on board.

 

Jonathan

 

An end and a beginning

The Unimog is a multipurpose all-wheel drive vehicle produced by Mercedes Benz.  Apparently when other off road vehicles reach their limits, the Unimog comes in to its own.  The limit comes early here in Kangerlussiaq, Greenland and so there are quite a few Unimogs used to travel from the town, overland to the Greenland Ice Sheet.  A Rosehearty team of 11 assembled in front of the vehicle enlisted for the day's expedition, an army green monster with knobbly tires and seriously high suspension.  Catherine and Mark were the two crew whose turn it was to join the owner and guests.  The purpose of the expedition was to provide some understanding of the zone between the retreating Greenland ice sheet and the top of Kangerlussiaq fjord.  Some I spoke to described the ride as bumpy and uncomfortable, but Mark, who appreciates anything mechanical, described it as "mean."

Mounds of pulverized rock and boulder litter the area where the ice sheet used to be.  When ice moves, everything gets pushed aside so there is a zone, created in the last 20 to 40 years, of glacial debris and of course melt water, fast running melt water.  The further away from the glacier you get, the more plant life is evident.  That Arctic ground cover dominates, providing color for our eyes but also nourishment for the musk ox and reindeer that graze this zone.

Cat later told me that the group was not allowed to walk too close to the ice edge.  Apparently, ice slabs can break off at any time and because they hit hard land rather than water they shatter on impact and can throw very large shards of ice out a significant distance.  Deaths have been reported in this no-go zone.

Our team saw herds of musk ox -- introduced in Greenland from the high Canadian Arctic - gathering in dry river beds and lush meadows.  Locals hunt the beasts, whose numbers have exploded due to the abundant food supply and lack of predators.  A lone reindeer cruised passed. The Unimog brought everyone home.

This journal entry marks the end of the Arctic/Greenland portion of the voyage.  The boss and his friends have departed and now we are just crew, left to prepare the boat and ourselves for the 3,500 mile sail  from Greenland to Italy.  Thanks for sailing with us so far; jump back on board once we cast off the lines at the end of the month.

—Jonathan

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Jerry Herring

Photo by Jerry Herring

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Jerry Herring

Photo by Jerry Herring

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Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Jerry Herring

Photo by Jerry Herring

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Rock and Heather

Rock and Heather

Hutch aimed Rosehearty's bow at Qeqertasussuk Island.  Low cloud and light rain obscured the coastline. 

"It's called smur," Hutch said.

"What is?" I asked.

"Drizzle with fog is called ' smur' in Scotland.  That's the noun but you can also use it as an adjective and say 'smurry'". 

"In Na Zelan we call it 'sput', chimed in Kiwi Mark.  "You can say 'it's sputting'.  That means light rain, you know, sput."

The British Admiralty pilot states rather stoically, "Tidal Streams set strongly across the approach to the Kangerlussuaq Fjord entrance.  They can attain a rate of 7 knots in the vicinity of Qeqertasussuk Island."

The day before we had scoured our tide Atlases on board as well as the internet for nearby tide stations.  Ultimately, the Arctic Command Center with whom we are required to communicate every 6 hours, provided tide times and heights for a point very close to Qeqertasussuk Island.  Our goal was to be at the entrance 3 hours after the morning's low water, in order to find slack water for the transit into the fjord.  The approach is from the east with submerged rocks and shallows to the north and south.  The abundance of smur was not helping.

Kangerlussuaq Fjord is the largest fjord in western Greenland, originating at the Qinnguata Kuussua river estuary and terminating a staggering 120 miles later in the waters of Davis Strait.  Kangerlussuaq is deep (more than 100 meters in many places),  wide (up to 5 miles) and lined with mountains reaching 1500 meters into the sky.  The waters close to Davis Strait are blue-black but further up the fjord, alluvial sediments from the Qinnguata Kuussua river transform the water to an eerie, unreadable emerald green.  At the very head of the fjord, the water turns cappuccino brown.  Depth transducers work intermittently, often flashing spurious readings. 

About 2 miles out, the smur lifted and we began to catch glimpses of the hidden land, layered, stretching from the sea towards the heart of the country.  "Now that is looking better," said Hugo, who had been watching the rain with consternation during the previous watch.  Misty cloud decorated the higher peaks, the land appeared dark. We approached on the leading transits pointed out in the sailing directions -- 099 True towards a range on the southern tip of Qeqertasussuk Island, until a second range came in to view bearing 056 on the northern end.  We held 056 for 1 mile and then turned 25 degrees to starboard and in to the middle of the fjord.  The tidal information provided by Arctic Command was accurate; we glided in with very little current, the two diesel engines pushing Rosehearty effortlessly out of the turbulent waters of Davis Strait in to the protected waters of Kangerlussiaq.  Markus watched the range beacons with binoculars.  Hutch had the helm, referring to the two independent electronic chart systems that were running.  I relayed depth information from the wheelhouse. The engineering team monitored critical systems and equipment.

For the next 7 hours we rumbled north in flat water, the panorama of the gorge gliding passed. The guests admired the surroundings over breakfast, attended to by Renee, Catherine and Lenka.  Hugo sprinted for vinegar, a shammy and a squeegee.  "You've got to have clean windows for these views!"  Not a smudge or smear survived Hugo's vinegar spritz and deftly guided blade.

Steep cliffs, riddled with black striations gave way to rounder hills, carpeted in pockets with verdant ground cover.  We dropped anchor on a narrow shelf with usable depths.  About two miles from the top of the fjord we spied a rocky beach on which we could land a tender.  An expedition was quickly organized.  Wolfie, our orange RIB, crunched ashore on a pink gravel beach.  A lush valley rose at a slight incline towards smooth hills.  "Keep an eye out for Arctic hare and fox," said Ken looking around,  "This is perfect hare habitat."

Our walk to the upper ridge brought us through lush Arctic flora.  "Coming from Devon Island and the places we visited much further north," said Simon, "really amplifies how lush this landscape is.  It would feel different if we hadn't been north first ."  Juniper, wild flower, and soft grasses covered the land like a patchwork quilt.  The ground was soft, loamy, giving way under our boots.  Russet reds, rich yellows, and vibrant pinks contrasted with black, lichen-smeared rock.  Paul spied several white dots; the hare were here for sure.  Unlike those we saw near Arctic Bay which sported mottled gray summer coats, these hare were snow white and easily visible from a distance.  Ken bent down and picked something up:  "Fox," he said, handing me a small narrow skull, picked clean, but still with sharp fangs intact.  Paul and Nadia explored on their own and had up close encounters with some brave hare.  They also found a reindeer skull, complete with antlers.  There was no wind.  It was very quiet, except for the hushed timbre of raindrops hitting our jackets.

Our group spread out.  This was to be our last day above the Arctic circle.  From here, the owners and their guests will depart.  Our journey by sea will carry us south, towards shorter days, warmer nights, away from Greenland across the Atlantic ocean to the Mediterranean.  On a high, flat promontory, with a commanding view of the rich Arctic carpet stretching down to the waters of Kangerlussiaq Fjord, I decided to build my Inuksuk.  I chose 7 stones, one for each of the lessons we learned in the far north.   But that will be the subject for another day.

--Jonathan

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Jonathan

Photo by Jonathan

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Southward

We ghosted through Disko Bay, leaving Ilulissat and her mighty glacier behind.  Along our route, we passed a number of giant bergs, calved from the Sermeq Kujalleq ice flow.  Richard launched his drone and took a few shots that provide an idea of the size and scale of the bergs in this area.  We angled southwest, then south and anchored in Sisimiut, the second largest city in Greenland.  Continuously inhabited for the last 4500 years, Sisimiut today is a colourful, eclectic town with a healthy mix of tourism, commercial fishing (shrimp, halibut and cod) and supply forwarding operations (to the more remote hamlets along the Greenland coast).  Guests and crew enjoyed walks ashore, visits to the museum and local shops.

Photo by Richard Smith

Photo by Richard Smith

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

From the sky

The helicopter was red and it stood out against the powder blue sky.  It could carry 11 passengers and that meant that our Arctic Guide, Ken Burton, and Renee would join the owners and guests for the scenic flight over the Sermeq Kujalleq ice flow.  We had seen it from the land; we had seen it from the water; now it was time to see it from the air.  The Bell 212 helicopter hammered the air and lifted off.  "It was very loud," Renee told me later.  "But luckily we all had headsets."  The chopper flew from the airport directly to the ice sheet, about 30 miles inland and landed on a rocky promontory near the ice.  "I felt like I was on the moon again,"  Renee laughed.  "It was rock under the helicopter but out towards the edges, I found quartz and -- it was weird --  sand; there was really fine sand; it must have been moondust." 

Out on the edge of the rocks, there were two round pods, which Ken identified as rescue pods, in the event that the helicopter became stranded and humans needed to spend a night or two before being rescued.  From the rocky ledge, the Greenland ice sheet, stretched out in all its glory, as far as the eye could see.  "The facts about this sheet are pretty impressive."  I could tell Ken was about to share some of his encyclopaedic knowledge.  "It is the second largest ice body in the world, after the Antarctic ice sheet. It's 1,500 miles long in a north-south direction, 680 miles wide east and west. When  you're standing on top of the ice sheet you are at an altitude of  7,000 ft. The ice under your feet is generally more than 1.2 miles thick and almost 2 miles at its thickest point.  If the entire 684,000 cubic miles of ice were to melt, it would lead to a global sea level rise of 24 feet."

The helicopter took to the skies once again and on this part of the trip, the group followed the ice topography -- from where the sheet spawns the glacier to where the glacier meets the sea.  "It's not all the same," Renee said.  "The ice sheet is pretty uniform, but as the river of ice gets closer to the sea, it looks different."

"A relatively round, smooth surface dominates the sheet and glacier," elaborated Ken.  "During summer, sinkholes on glaciers called moulins form on the sheet; that's where summer meltwater streams on the surface of the glacier finds a crevasse or other weak spot in the ice and begins to pour down through the ice."  Apparently, Moulins look like holes in the ice, can be quite symmetrical.  Water entering these holes may travel all the way to the glacial base, lubricating the land ice interface.

"But once the glacier meets the sea, things change dramatically," he continued.  "The ice meets the seabed and the water; it starts to float.  It cracks and breaks.  Jagged teeth rise up from the stresses.  Ice bergs are born."

They flew out over the sea, right over the spot we had hiked to the day before. Over the bergs and clear water, they found whales, swimming in the bays created by the bergs, their long pectoral fins shining beneath the surface, their liquid breaths erupting in to the air.    

"It's hard to decide which was more mind-blowing -- the ice sheet or the whales," Renee told me in the wheelhouse. 

Perhaps President Trump, who has recently expressed an interest in purchasing Greenland from Denmark, has been captivated by these extraordinary sights as well.

—Jonathan

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Renee

Photo by Renee

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

"And ice, mast-high, came floating by, as green as emerald." -- Coleridge

We have not been on the dock since late July and so it was with a bit of excitement that we rose early, after just a few hours sleep, to prepare lines, inflate fenders, and ready Rosehearty to go along side in the small commercial port of Ilulissat.  Heavy fatigue blanketed the crew but at anchor on this peaceful morning, with these surroundings, the fatigue softened the edges and did not detract from the focus of the preparations underway.  There was satisfaction in the long hours, hard work, and achievements of the voyage so far.  Strong coffee was served, one popular blend nicknamed the Nescafe Mochaccino turbo, which consists of 3 heaping teaspoons of Nescafe instant coffee, one teaspoon of hot chocolate mix, warm milk and an espresso floater.

The town of Ilulissat lay perched on the the rocky hills that surrounded the anchorage the blues, reds, greens, and browns contrasting with granite and ice.  Small local fishing boats sped out of the harbour towards the open sea, their drivers weaving around bergy bits as if they were in racing cars, negotiating a slalom course.  The wake from their boats angled outward, striking the hollowed out waterlines of the nearby ice bergs, sending out a sloshy reverberating slap of cold water against hard ice. 

Rosehearty's presence at the commercial dock drew crowds.  Behind us an rusty tramp steamer was being loaded with gravel.  A bull dozer scooped up the material and unceremoniously deposited it into the gaping hold  of the ship.  Fishing boats of every size, shape and color lined the wharves.  Line handlers, fork lift operators, stevedores, agents, and local families walked the dock to look at Rosehearty, the enormous white ship berthed in their town.  Everyone waved. 

To understand the Sermeq Kujalleq ice flow you have to see it from several different angles.  It is not simply the enormous, fast moving glacier or the vast quantity of island-sized ice bergs that it calves off.  To comprehend its size and volume, you have to connect the bergs to the glacier and the glacier to the actual Greenland ice sheet from which it emerges.  The Greenland ice sheet covers 80% of the island and contains an estimated 2.7 million cubic kilometres of ice, the equivalent about 7% of all the fresh water on earth.  And so on board Rosehearty, Captain Hutch and Ken, the expedition leader, had discussed three missions to provide perspective:  first, there would be an overland hike to the glacier; second, tenders would carry all our guests to the leading edge of the flow, where the river of ice meets the water; and third, a local helicopter company would fly everyone over the flow, to see its connection to the actual Greenland ice sheet and get a sense of how the three components are stitched together to make up the whole.

Four taxis carried the team from the port to the beginning of the marked trail.  I travelled with Hans.  He had a broad face, narrow eyes and an infectious, disarming smile.  Hans spoke English, Greenlandic and Danish.  As we drove through town he pointed out the supermarket, a new brasserie that featured 6 different craft beers, and the local whale monger, where several varieties of fresh whale and seal could be purchased.  The town was compact, very clean, busy with locals and tourists.  Dozens of huskies were chained to rocks or housed in cages near the outskirts of town.  Many puppies and juveniles, not chained, frolicked near the adult dogs.  "They are on vacation right now," Hans explained.  "When the snow and ice come, their work begins."  Sledges lay stacked near the kennels.    Greenland dogs, Samoyeds and Siberian Huskies seemed to make up the bulk of the breeds we saw.  I read that all these breeds have closely spaced toes with webbed feet for gripping in snow.  A unique arrangement of blood vessels in their legs protect them against frostbite.  Dogs have been used for thousands of years in the Arctic, some breeds carefully designed for hauling and others (crossed with wolves) for hunting.  The road ended at a sprawling construction site, where, Hans explained, a new visitor's center was being built.  The frames of this new structure stood out against a blue sky.  This was going to be a modern building, angular with huge plate glass windows.  The Sermeq Kujalleq ice flow is a UNESCO world heritage site and welcomes many visitors from all over the world.

A simple boardwalk spans the distance between the road and the glacial viewing areas.  Built about a foot above the ground, the boardwalk follows the contour of the land.  It is wide enough for you and one companion, to walk side by side.  This encourages quiet conversation but also uninhibited silence.  Black rocks flecked with green lichen stand in bold contrast to tiny clumps of tundra flowers, furry mosses, wild blueberries.  We were back to that "carpet of color" that Ken had described during our visit to the Inuksuk at Low Point.  The boardwalk bends downhill, gradually snaking away towards the sea.  An impressive, layered canvas unfolds -- the colourful flora of the tundra, the dark rocks, the sea, the ice.  Gasps and exclamations compete against the staccato of camera shutters, breaking an otherwise silent landscape.

Describing the Sermeq Kujalleq glacier is difficult, but photographing it is even harder.  You snap the picture, then look at the image on the small LCD screen.  "No that's not it," you think to yourself and then try another shot, perhaps with less zoom or a different lens.  How do you capture a river ice that seems still and frozen on the one hand but is actually moving -- rapidly by glacial standards -- on the other?  Cracks and groans can be heard; weird shapes emerge -- jagged teeth, smooth hillocks, ice boulders packed with dirt and debris.  We sit on benches overlooking the scene.  We drink tea -- steaming mugs of Rooibos Chai tea.  Smoky tendrils, laced with clove, warm our faces.  We put our cameras down and just look, letting the mind's eye, rather than the camera, sear the image in to our memory. 

In the afternoon we gear up, load in to the tenders, and head to sea.  It is a special place, where an ice floe of this size, meets the ocean.  Island sized bergs stand motionless, their true mass below the surface.  We glide among the bays created by the ice, wide deep channels, lined ice-blue cliffs.  Glaucous gulls and Northern Fulmars swoop and dive.  A pair of whales surface, expelling huge breaths, then arching back into the sea.  We shut off the engines and drift.  If you are lucky enough to be in the Arctic on a still summer's day, the sounds as much as the sights will accost you.  The groan of a glacier, the crack of a piece of an ice berg, splitting and falling in to the sea, the lap of a wavelet rebounding off the hollowed out edge and an ice strip, the drips of water streaming off the sunward facing edges of the ice, the whoosh of whales.  "Everything seems louder," comments Simon.  "I think it is because the air is so dense, even the smallest noises are amplified." 

The cold begins to penetrate our layers.  We pull our hats lower, and our neck warmers higher.  Ethan, driving Wolfie, indicates that they are headed back to port.  Mark, in command of the Nouvarania, nods thankfully.  Even in a full Mustang suit, with balaclava, mittens and boots, he is starting to feel the cold.  Up on to a plane jump the boats, parting an icy wind on their way back to Rosehearty.

—Jonathan

Ilulissat colors with Roeshearty’s masts

Ilulissat colors with Roeshearty’s masts

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Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Ethan

Photo by Ethan

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Shape Shifting

The island of Disko broke the wind and the waves.  Qeqertarsuaq is the Inuit name for Disko and it means "the large island".  With its 3300 square mile area, one can understand how this behemoth might have received this moniker.  Rosehearty roared into her lee with double headsails, 25 to 30 knots of breeze aft of the beam, a 2 meter sea on the quarter.  We had just sailed more than 400 miles across Davis Strait.  And then everything went quiet.  Sails went limp and had to be furled away; the sea became smooth. And then, the icebergs appeared.  Now we have seen plenty of icebergs on this voyage,  but what we had not seen was the quantity and size of the bergs that came into view. 

On every part of the horizon, everywhere we looked, big bergs stood, jutting in to the sky.  The ice sheets and strips of Lancaster sound were impressive – and dangerous – but these mountains of frozen water were something entirely different.  The sheer bulk of what we were seeing left us in awe.  There was plenty of deep water between the bergs and very few bergy bits.  This layout, combined with the great visibility and kind sea conditions, allowed us to become absorbed in the view.  The thing with icebergs is that when you see them from a moving ship, they change shape and color as you drive passed.  The sun moves the shadows around. Refraction plays tricks on  you: small bergs become big bergs; their masses floating above the sea..  The clear air makes things that are very far away seem closer.  Ice bergs shapes shift.  On the flybridge, we described what we saw – one looked like a gaff-rigged topsail schooner, another was the shape of a perfect pyramid from Egypt, and a third, we were convinced, looked like a Scottish terrier, resting on all fours. 

The ice bergs we were seeing are calved from the mighty Sermeq Kujalleq glacier, situated next to the picturesque town of Ilulissat.  This icefjord is a designated world heritage site.  The UNESCO site explains, “One of the few places where ice from the Greenland ice cap enters the sea, Sermeq Kujalleq is also one of the fastest moving (40 m per day) and most active glaciers in the world. Its annual calving of over 46 cubic kilometres of ice, i.e. 10% of all Greenland calf ice, is more than any other glacier outside Antarctica. The combination of a huge ice-sheet and the dramatic sounds of a fast-moving glacial ice-stream calving into a fjord full of icebergs make for a dramatic and awe-inspiring natural phenomenon.” 

We ghosted into the Ilulissat anchorage at 0100 local time.  The sky burned orange.  A waning moon rose.  Time for a few hours sleep in this cradle of bergs.

—Jonathan

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

In the Beginning

If you look at a detailed nautical chart of Baffin Island, you will see that the east coast is heavily indented with deep bays and fjords.  These are rarely visited since ice can be abundant, winds high, and depths too great to anchor.  And so prior to our departure from the Canadian Arctic and before crossing Davis Straits towards Greenland, Hutch suggested that we tour one of the larger fjord complexes.  He chose the Buchan Gulf about hundred miles from Pond Inlet.  With a stout easterly funneling through the narrow channel that leads to Davis Strait, we left Pond behind and made for open water.

Buchan Gulf is comprised of four distinct arms cutting from Davis Strait into the interior of Baffin Island; each of these arms is more than 20 miles long, lined with mountains 1000 meters high, with depths plunging to 500 meters.  The whole way south, the Baffin Coast was shrouded in low cloud, misty rain, and fog.  When we were about ten miles out, the curtain lifted temporarily and we caught glimpses of high rocky mountains, snow, winding glaciers.  But no sooner had we seen the coast, that it disappeared once again behind the thick shade.  "If it's too foggy when we get to the entrance, we won't go in," announced Hutch.  When doing our route planning, he had discovered that the electronic charts for the area were incorrect; land masses were placed almost half a mile from their actual positions.  Our tour of the fjords would be done with our eyes, radar, dividers, parallel rules and a Danish paper chart.  We would keep a careful watch on our depth since there were very few soundings on the chart; in these waters, 200 meters can turn to 10 meters very quickly.  It had taken us all day to get to this fjord; would we have to turn away?

As we swung west onto our final heading we were teased several more times with glimpses of what lay behind the curtain but each preview lasted only a few minutes.  On we pressed into the unknown.  Fortunately, the curtain went up just as we arrived at the mouth of the fjord.  The show was on. We entered a foreign land.  Sheer cliffs plunged straight down into obsidian water.  The cliff faces looked as if an artist had taken his spatula and smeared the canvas with every shade of brown and red.  Hard blue glaciers clung to rocky ravines.  The ice was flecked with boulders and other debris.  Every once in a while we spotted the tops of the mountains, where the clouds parted momentarily.  The summits were sharp, toothlike.  Everyone came on deck, wide-eyed.  What was this place? 

I said to Germain, "It feels like the land that time forgot.:"  "Or maybe," he replied, "the land at the beginning of time."  The shapes were alien, cold, hard.  Everything felt raw.  When I looked at the glaciers I expected at any time to see a group of abominable snowmen, emerge from an icy cave, hold their furry arms skyward, and shake their fists at the intruders.  I imagined huge megalodon still hunted the icy waters and pterodactyls still patrolled the skies. 

—Jonathan

Photo by Jerry Herring

Photo by Jerry Herring

Sunlight lured us in.  Photo by Jerry Herring

Sunlight lured us in. Photo by Jerry Herring

Clouds parted to reveal the toothy summits.  Photo by Jerry Herring

Clouds parted to reveal the toothy summits. Photo by Jerry Herring

Hard blue glaciers clung to rocky ravines.  Photo by Jerry Herring

Hard blue glaciers clung to rocky ravines. Photo by Jerry Herring

We entered a foreign land.  Photo by Catherine Carr

We entered a foreign land. Photo by Catherine Carr

I expected at any time to see a group of abominable snowmen, emerge from an icy cave, hold their furry arms skyward, and shake their fists at the intruders.  Photo by Hugo

I expected at any time to see a group of abominable snowmen, emerge from an icy cave, hold their furry arms skyward, and shake their fists at the intruders. Photo by Hugo

Scratching at the surface

The sun is setting now;  it is midnight but it is not dark.  A red sky lingers.  Shadows cover the mountains but behind them, the sky is aflame.  "Renee, come take a look."  I hear Mark call on the radio.  Renee heads to the foredeck.  She witnesses (and later describes to me) one of the strange phenomena of the arctic summer.  A full moon rises slowly behind the mountains of Baffin Island.  But it does not continue to track higher and higher into the sky; instead, the lower limb barely reaches the peaks; it hangs there, continues its barely discernible arc and then slides behind the mountains once again, just as the sun, which has only dipped below the horizon for a few hours, rises again.  Night is day; day is night.  "It was beautiful the way the moon came up and was then cradled by mountains," says Renee. “It seemed to start to set almost as soon as it appeared.”

Earlier in the day we explored Pond Inlet, which has a population of 1600 and is the largest Canadian hamlet above 72 degrees North.  The Inuit name is Mittimatalik, which translates roughly in to the "place where Mittima is buried."  Not one book nor resident could tell me who Mittima was or why he was celebrated with a place named after him.  Our day consisted of provisioning, walking the town, visiting the cultural centre, chatting with local children and their parents and absorbing the contrasting views.  This is our first contact with anyone outside the yacht since August 4.  The weather was stunning -- another of those cloudless, still days with sharp light illuminating every texture -- craggy cliff, weathered homes,  broad Inuit faces, immense space.

I found myself puzzled by Pond Inlet; like Arctic Bay, the houses were bare and utilitarian with very few colors.  Carcasses of snow mobiles were stacked in yards.  Outboard motors partially stripped lay on pieces of cardboard.  A child's bike lay in a stream. A Chevy Blazer, with both front wheels missing, was propped up by bits of timber.  Power lines crisscrossed the sky, nests of wires emerging from transformers.  Chip packets, plastic drink bottles, and a hat lay in the road.  Quad bikes sputtered past, laden with parents, children, rifles, Narwhale tusks, gasoline cans.  Ford F150s rolled near me, towing aluminium boats, kicking up plumes of dust.  Huskies, chained on the beach, yowled.  The largest ravens I have ever seen, cawed at us.  An Inuit child we passed along the way, cawed back. 

This was the surface layer, the foreground.  In the background - just below the surface – we found something else.  There were the mountains, immense ranges plummeting into the sea, there was the water, blue-green mixed with the mud of glacial runoff.  There were the people, lots of people were outdoors, the joy of the brief summer. Kids played, drank from cans of Orange crush, munched on Cheetos.  Women carried babies in slings on their backs while chatting on their iphones.  Long canoe-like boats stacked with harpoons and fishing gear and powered by large 4 stroke motors were hauled up on the beach.  Fathers and sons readied them for the day's hunt.  There was talk of seal and whale.  In lilting phrases, one local hunter answered our questions.  “What is the harpoon for?” I asked.  “What is the harpoon for?” he answered, repeating my question before offering, “Narwhal.” 

Loaded with fresh produce, comfortably tired from several hours of walking but still with lingering questions, we returned to Rosehearty.  It was a day spent among the modern Inuit, watching a full moon roll briefly across mountains in a red sky.

A red sky lingers. Photo by Renee.

A red sky lingers. Photo by Renee.

A full moon rises slowly behind the mountains of Baffin Island. Photo by Renee

A full moon rises slowly behind the mountains of Baffin Island. Photo by Renee

DSC02593 A.jpg
Inuit DAB! Photo by Jerry Herring

Inuit DAB! Photo by Jerry Herring

Photo by Jonathan

Photo by Jonathan

Photo by Jonathan

Photo by Jonathan

Photo by Joan Herring

Photo by Joan Herring

Photo by Jerry Herring

Photo by Jerry Herring

Photo by Jonathan

Photo by Jonathan

Photo by Jonathan

Photo by Jonathan

Photo by Jerry Herring

Photo by Jerry Herring

Photo by Jonathan

Photo by Jonathan

Sign.jpg
Hugo and mountains.jpg
Cross.jpg
Town art 2.jpg
Girls with puppy.JPG

Rust and Snow

Rust and snow

Ice strips, 25 knots of wind and fog greeted us as we left Maxwell Bay and headed east.  The watch teams struggled to distinguish clutter from real targets on the radars.  Some ice strips were large but there were many broken, flat smaller sections as well as smaller shapely ice bergs.  These are not as beautiful in the fog.  We proceeded slowly with eyes straining.  Hutch and the ice pilot, Germaine, were up most of the night.  By 0500 the fog cleared and the ice was dispersed, except for a few very large bergs that presented excellent radar echoes, and, coincidentally, became beautiful again.  Under a shockingly blue sky, we headed south across Lancaster Sound, away from Devon Island and towards our new area of exploration, Bylot and Baffin Islands. 

The Navy Board Inlet is a wide, deep channel that separates Bylot Island from Baffin Island an connects Lancaster Sound to Baffin Bay.  The inlet is 5 miles wide, runs for 120 miles.  Depths range from 100 to 500 meters.  Rosehearty entered the inlet at noon local time and for 16 hours we cruised slowly in its sheltering embrace.  The scenery changed dramatically from what we had seen the previous 10 days.  Hoodoos were less prominent -- Hugo and I found a few and called them "hidden hoodoos" -- they were replaced by smooth rust-coloured mountains in the foreground and snow-capped peaks behind.  Glaciers crept down to the sea.  Scars decorated the land.  Everything was miles away but the textures were prominent and emphatic.  Scale and proportion were difficult to comprehend.

We paused at place called "Low Point" -- a name that did not do justice to this location.  To the west, lichen covered rocks and a fertile meadow spread out before us.  To the east lay the Byam Marten Mountain Range, a prominent line of snow-capped peaks that resembled the Italian Alps.  And next to us rested a huge ice berg, aground, powdery on top and metallic blue on the sides.  We launched a tender and a group of explorers landed on a rocky beach while Rosehearty drifted quietly offshore.  "This is one of my favourite walks," expedition leader Ken explained.  "Once we get to the top there is going to be a great photograph, with the carpet of colour, the ice berg, Rosehearty and the mountains.  There is an impressive Inuksuk at the top as well.  It's probably hundreds of years old, it keeps watch over the bay."

While the line of hikers made their way to the top, we edged Rosehearty closer to the ice berg, positioning her for her portrait.  "Square up the tender pole for the photo," suggested Hutch. 

In his book, Canada's Arctic, Ken writes of Low Point, "Hiking up from the shore near Low Point, I came to the sober realization that a majestic carpet of colour had been set out before me.  It was as if some unseen power had been running amok with acrylic paints and abstract texturing tools.  Everywhere I looked was colour...crimson, yellow, cobalt blue, violet and emerald green."  For our hikers who had just spent the last week in the relative monochrome of Devon Island, this new palette and the varied textures would have been a sensory bombardment. 

The climbers radioed from the top.  "Move forward a couple of boat lengths," the radio crackled.  "It's beautiful. We're having a cup of tea and soaking up the amazing views.  The Inuksuk is showing us where to look."

-- Jonathan

Glaciers crept down to the sea

Glaciers crept down to the sea

smooth rust-coloured mountains in the foreground and snow-capped peaks behind.  Photo by Hugo

smooth rust-coloured mountains in the foreground and snow-capped peaks behind. Photo by Hugo

The textures were prominent and emphatic.  Photo by Hugo

The textures were prominent and emphatic. Photo by Hugo

Hidden hoodoos, photos by Hugo

Hidden hoodoos, photos by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Peter Box

Photo by Peter Box

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Layers by Peter Box

Layers by Peter Box

Abstract human by Peter Box

Abstract human by Peter Box

Calling for water

We dined with the bears in view.  They watched us and we watched them.  When the galley extraction system sent the aroma of broiled chicken skyward, I thought I saw the mama bear put her nose in the air and take a few deep drafts. How fortunate were we to be sitting in the cockpit and whenever we felt like it, glance over to see what these bears were doing?   Sometimes they crouched on all fours, other times they lay on their sides.  I dozed off at midnight; the bears were still awake.  I came on deck at 6.  Both bears were lying in a small hammock of grass, fast asleep.  There was no movement on board; it was a pleasure to simply watch them rest.  About 0700, the young bear rolled on his back and proceeded to execute an enormous stretch, forepaws extended and hind legs as well, the way Finn, our black lab on board might do.  The mother stirred but did not rise.  Ice started coming in around the point of the island and sweeping towards the boat.  Time to prep poles once again urge the floes passed. 

Around mid-day the bears made their way from their hammock down to the water.  They roamed along the beach, consuming a bit more seaweed.  A light, misty rain fell.  The clouds descended to the water; tails of mist curled off the edges.  The bears walked out of view, leaving the island empty. We would miss them.

As it would be another 4 to 6 hours before the next ice chart was scheduled to be published, Hutch decided to send the twin-engine rib to the entrance of Maxwell Bay so the crew’s report on ice, wind and sea could be compared to the forecast conditions.  Markus, Richie and our ice pilot Germain prepared the boat and themselves for the 20 mile round trip voyage.  Extra precautions were put in play – multiple means of communications, AIS tracker on the tender, and our state of the art insulated “Mustang suits”, and ski goggles for the team.  A thermos of hot coffee with chocolate and milk was added for good measure. 

The reconnaissance team delivered a favourable report – wind in the 20s,  1/10 to 2/10 ice, seas less than 1,5 meters.  “We’ll wait for the ice chart, and assuming the sat radar and chart agree with Germain’s observations, we’ll heave up anchor and head east.”

With a few hours to burn before departure, Richard set up a small fleet of remote control yachts and we enjoyed some jousting and rendezvous sailing near Rosehearty.  Yacht racing in the high Arctic!

Photo by Ethan

Photo by Ethan

Photo by Ethan

Photo by Ethan

Capture Recon.JPG
AUS higher and faster

AUS higher and faster

Photo by Richard

Photo by Richard

Red 09 called for water but AUS 66 did not give way, OUCH

Red 09 called for water but AUS 66 did not give way, OUCH

In the company of bears

We are running two to three expeditions per day from Rosehearty out in to the furthest reaches of Maxwell Bay.  At the moment, a lot of ice is being drawn in to the bay, which is a mixed blessing.  On the one hand, the ice carries with it the prospect of seals, walrus and polar bear.  But the ice also brings tension, with the larger floes as big as or bigger than Rosehearty, long flat sections, often with submerged ledges that extend well beyond what we see on the surface, ledges that could contact rudder, shaft or propeller if they drift passed close enough.  Big sheets started coming in about midnight.  And that was when the call came out, bear on one of the floes, just off our port side.  Guests and crew were awakened to share in the spectacle -- Nanuk under the midnight sun, having a rest, hitching a ride.  Throughout the evening, the floes came, several with bear on them.  The overnight watch teams as well as guests who refused to sleep held a vigil over the scene.

At 0700, the floes were too large and too close and so Markus, who had just come on watch,  made the call to bring both engines and generators on line, and heave up anchor to avoid contact with the approaching slabs.  “You’ve got two engines and three on the board,” Richie confirmed from the control room.   The noise of the thruster, windlass and chain, startled the bear who up until this point, might have mistaken Rosehearty all in white as just another piece of ice floating with the current.  Chef Artur was awake, doing his normal 10 minute stretch in the bridge before commencing his very long day in the galley.   He told me later in an excited French Armenian accent “You should have seen dat bear when he heard the anchor.  It was incredible." 

Once safely re-anchored away from the ice, we launched the first tender.  The mission was to scope out a waterfall about 4 miles from Rosehearty and to look for wildlife along the way.  We sped off in flat water with Hugo at the helm, Ken pointing where he wanted us to go.  The rest of scanned the ice and the shores, with binoculars, telephoto lenses and the naked eye.  When doing 25 knots in the tender, a cold wind becomes an icy blast very quickly.  Exposed skin tingles at first, then burns, and throbs, unless you cover it.  Hugo sported his balaclava, ski goggles, thick ski gloves.

At first, we thought we were looking at dirty ice -- rocks and mud picked up either when the berg is still part of a glacier or when a slab is grounded temporarily by the tide.  But the dirt became a shape and the shape turned into a seal.  Hugo killed the motors and everyone on board became silent – hopeful and reverent at the same time.  We used the paddles to inch our way closer.  The seal had a clear view of us, lifting his head, watchful.  To our delight, the seal stayed put and allowed us to enjoy the views through binoculars and zoom lenses.  “It’s a bearded seal,” Ken explained.  I read later that bearded seals are the largest of the Arctic seals and can grow to 450kg.  They forage usually in bays for clams, octopus and squid, and in open water can dive as deep as 400 meters.  They sport long, even bushy whiskers and a heavy jaw, from which their name is derived (erignathus barbatus).  Apparently, the males sing and can be heard from as far as 20 kilometers away.  When we were about a 100 meters away, the seal had had enough of our presence and flopped into the icy water and swam away. 

In the northern most part of Maxwell Bay’s western arm, there are large sections of moist earth, turned green with arctic grasses, lichens and plants.  By now we had become familiar with this type of terrain and what might be found here and so we were not surprised when Ken pointed towards the fertile slope and said, “Now that is a beautiful specimen.”  A lone musk ox .  We all tried to zoom in and shoot but Paul pretty much summed it when he said,  “I’m going to have quite a few photos of black dots.  I hope my friends believe me when I tell them the dot is a musk ox.”  Where there are musk ox, there are usually wolves, said Ken.  We strained and squinted, imagined a pack of wolves working in unison to avoid the horns and hoofs in their struggle to bring the beast down. 

After our return, more ice sheets entered the anchorage.  Ethan and I used long boat hooks to push the smaller sections of ice away from the hull.  For the larger sheets, we had to use thruster or drop an extra shot of chain and use engines to get out of the way.  Lenka, who was in the master cabin, hear crunching and watched with consternation as she saw boat hooks prodding the ice.  Germain, our ice pilot and Hutch poured over an ice chart and radar sat images that had just been published.  Neither was smiling.  To our east, the entire 60-mile width of Lancaster Sound showed the color orange with reference numbers inside the “egg”.  This translated to 7/10 total coverage, 1/10 first year ice, 7/10 thick first year ice, vast floe size.  Rosehearty was effectively blocked from traveling east or west.  “My concern,” said Germain, “is that with the southeast winds, we will have a lot of ice coming into this bay.  We either try to get out now, or we have to be prepared to wait for a couple of days to leave.”  With winds in the sound at 25 knots, gusting 30 knots, we opted to stay put for at least 24 hours until the next ice report was issued.

Hutch sent the RIB to sound the anchorage behind a nearby island.  The island we thought might make a nice shield against ice being dragged in from the sea.  Mark and I approached, checking depths and looking for ice.  “What’s that on the side of the hill?” Mark said.  “An indistinct lump broke up the otherwise flat slope on the hill.  “could be a boulder or an Inuksuk,” I said.  The binoculars were already on his eyes.  “It’s a bear,” he said, “Have a look.”  On a wide patch of rocky ground the bear came in to view.  And then something quite magical happened.  One shape became two and we suddenly realized we were not looking at a lone male bear but instead were in the company of a mother bear and her adolescent cub.  We radioed the boat, shut off the motors and hoped that the sight of the tender and the approaching Rosehearty would not spook the animals.  Mark and I watched as everyone assembled on the foredeck.  Hutch approached slowly with Rosehearty, and once in position, radioed Ethan to walk the anchor and chain out, rather than do the normal free wheel drop.  We have found that nothing scares wildlife away quicker than a 460 kg anchor and 3 shots of chain rumbling out of the box.  The bears seemed indifferent.  The cub edged towards the shore, while the mother sat on her haunches on higher ground.  She lifted her nose and sniffed to determine our status.  At the high tide line was a long line of brown seaweed.  The young bear picked at it, swallowed some.  Both Mark and I had the impression that the young bear would have preferred seal or Narwhal but at mother’s insistence was required to choke down the ursine equivalent of spinach.  As soon as Rosehearty was anchored, we picked up our team on the side door and moved slowly towards the beach.  The wind blew from behind us and edged us toward the bears.  Ken instructed Mark to approach from the side, not head on.  In silence we drifted in.  Radios were turned off.  Cameras whirred.  The female bear looked on.  We were almost to the beach, truly in the company of bears.

Nanuk under the midnight sun — Photo by Catherine Carr

Nanuk under the midnight sun — Photo by Catherine Carr

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Richie

Photo by Richie

Photo by Dr. Paul

Photo by Dr. Paul

Photo by Lenka

Photo by Lenka

Ice chart 1.JPG
Ice chart 2.JPG
Photo by Richie

Photo by Richie

Photo by Richie

Photo by Richie

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Parting shot!! by Richard

Parting shot!! by Richard

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Polar Desert

I remember hearing David Attenborough explain in one of his documentaries that in the open ocean there are vast areas that are devoid of life, interspersed with areas of abundance.  Where there is krill or anchovy or herring, there are likely to be all of the larger creatures that are sustained by them; but where there are none of these lower food chain organisms there will be few if any larger creatures.  The open ocean can be a desert.  Two days ago, we walked for an hour not far from the shore of the Franklin memorial and found no life, a polar desert.  Even Ken was surprised as we marched up the slopes of crumbled rock -- no lichens, no grasses.  We did find one object or I should say one object dispersed in to 3 pieces.  Ken spotted it and brought us over to it.  A weather balloon, possibly released by the Defense Research Establishment or NASA had ended up here.  The remains of the balloon and line, the circuit board, and the battery pack are here now for future generations to find and ponder.

Yesterday, after re-positioning to a bay called Maxwell Bay, we hiked for a few hours and then explored by tender for a few hours.  On land, we sloshed through a rich, almost clay-like soil full of lichen, moss and small plants.  “Musk ox territory,” Ken announced.   Musk oxen live in the Arctic (we had seen a few in the far distance the day before) and roam the tundra in search of the roots, mosses, and lichens that sustain them. In winter, they use their hooves to dig through snow to graze on these plants. During the summer, they supplement their diet with Arctic flowers and grasses, often feeding near water.  We found plenty of droppings and hoof prints and then that welcome word from Ken, “Wow!” broke the silence.  We joined him and looked down at the well-preserved skull of an adult Musk Ox.   

“I think this one was killed by a bear or wolves,” explained Ken.  “If a hunter had shot this animal, he would have taken the horns, which are used in carvings.” 

In the afternoon we loaded in to two tenders and explored the upper reaches of Maxwell Bay.  In the glassy water, we could see tiny fish near the surface.   I was able to scoop one up and have a look; it was tiny, wriggling in the palm of my hand.  Many birds – our famous “Kanardlys” (otherwise known as Guillemots) and Glaucous Gulls were paddling around on the surface picking up these sprat.  We ventured near some river outlets and took a few casts with the rods we had brought.  Arctic Char apparently roam these areas at this time of the year.  No luck there, but I did manage to drop my lure to 30 meters and snag the monster pictured below.  Our water tour ended with a close inspection of one large ice berg floating serenely in the bay.  We gazed upon it as one might view a piece of art in a gallery.  Floating in absolute glass with a perfect reflection beneath it, the iceberg changed shape and color as we motored around it.  The Polar desert has given way to a pocket of abundance.  What will today bring?

WX balloon 1.jpg
Musk ox 3.jpg
Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Ethan

Photo by Ethan

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

Look Small then Look Big

The ice strips marched in from Lancaster Sound.  We watched them in awe and frustration.  Twenty knots of wind blew down the wide channel, yet these strips, rather than follow the course of the wind and be of no concern to us, edged across the wind and sea fetch, in to the Beechey Island anchorage where Rosehearty lay secure.  In the wheelhouse, we tracked the ice for 2 hours.  “I have ze impression,” said Germaine, our Canadian ice pilot, “zat we are in a gyre.”  It appeared that the ice was being dragged in to the bay from the Sound, and then pulled in a counter-clockwise direction along the 10 meter depth contour line, and ultimately pushed to the far reaches of the bay.  Rosehearty was anchored just outside this 10 meter contour.  “It’s high tide in an hour, we’ll see if this current reverses itself and flushes the ice back out in to the sound,” said Hutch.  High tide came and went but the ice continued its resolute march toward us.  At 2330 we started engines,  heaved up anchor, and moved around the floe to re-anchor in ice free water.  By this time the wind had freshened to around 30 knots.  Richie and I were on the bow operating the windlass for the pick up and the drop.  Exposed skin hurt, gloved hands became numb.  We huddled behind the genoa furler to find a small lee while Hutch picked his way through the ice to our new anchorage.  We were cold, but imagine how Captain John Franklin and his men felt in the fall of 1845, when the decision was made to anchor the exploration ships Terror and the Erebus in this bay and spend the winter – locked in ice, waiting for the thaw in spring, in order to continue their efforts to be the first to complete the transit of the Northwest Passage. 

The Franklin expedition of 1845 was the best funded and best equipped expedition in the history of Arctic exploration.  24 officers and 108 sailors set out from England to be the first to sail from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, thereby opening shorter and more lucrative trade routes between the far east and Europe and affording the crew a share of the sizeable reward of twenty thousand pounds sterling offered by the crown.  The Terror and Erebus were Hela-class bomb ships of 380 tons, stoutly built and both veterans of the war of 1812.  They had been retrofitted with steam engines and could travel at 4 knots without sails.  For operations in ice they had retractable rudders and propeller shafts.  They carried enough food for 3 years, had fine cutlery, a library, and as much coal as they could fit into their bilges.  They wintered where Rosehearty lay at anchor.  Three sailors died during this stopover but in the spring the ships set out once again, but they only succeeded in traveling a few hundred miles before the ice grabbed their ships and locked them in place.  More crew died.  Those that lived, abandoned the ships and set out on an overland journey south, in the hopes of finding help in the sparsely populated but relatively well mapped wilderness of the Northern Territories.  Oral histories of the Inuit peoples indicate that the sailors may have seen these indigenous local nomadic hunters.  But as far as scholars can tell, there was no contact.  What we do know is that all 129 men perished, the last 30 or so in a place now referred to as Starvation Cove.  After more than 150 years of searching, the doomed ships were finally discovered in 2014, on the bottom but in pristine condition as far as wrecks are concerned, about 300 miles from where we are anchored today.  “After a lot of debate, treasure hunting, and forensic analysis,” explained Ken during our shore expedition, “most historians have concluded that a combination of pneumonia, tuberculosis, scurvy, starvation, exposure, and lead poisoning killed the crews of the Terror and Erebus.”  Sitting on a large rock listening to the explanation, the boss looked at Ken and said dryly, ”Tell me the good news!”  We all laughed but Ken pressed on, “The good news is that the many search and rescue missions that were sent out to find Franklin ended up surveying and mapping this vast archipelago, allowing us to do what we are doing now.”  He paused to let that sink in.  “But there is a bit of bad news: more men and ships were lost searching for Franklin than were lost in the expedition itself.”

The shores of Beechey Island are made up of flat, shingly rock.  High cliffs sweep down on to a narrow isthmus that connects Beechey Island with Devon Island.  Blocks of pack ice are aground on the beach.  Hugo runs Wolfie up on to shore between two enormous slabs; the RIB crunches to a stop and we all remove our life jackets and step onto the beach.  We start at the Franklin Memorial, a series of different structures dedicated to Franklin and his men as well as to the subsequent rescue expeditions that used this bay and these shores to stage their missions.  The remains of the Northumberland House, erected by one of the search parties in 1852, are visible.  We read the various plaques, look out at the bay and try to imagine.  From the Franklin Memorial we walk two kilometres.  There are no trees or shrubs of any kind; we see the graves from a long way off.  There are four graves.  Three belong to men from the Terror and Erebus expedition who died during that first winter and one to a sailor from a subsequent search mission.  The stones are loose under our feet, though just below the surface, the permafrost layer is hard.  In the 1980s the bodies of the three sailors buried here were exhumed for forensic analysis; the pathologist who conducted the studies remarked how well preserved to the bodies were due to the stable temperatures of the permafrost layer in which the men were buried.  Low clouds scud across the bay.  Rosehearty appears and disappears in fog and mist.  There is a chill in the air.  Ethan opens his backpack and produces hot tea.  He has sugar and a spoon for stirring but apologizes for having forgotten the flask of milk that Renee’ had prepared.  We accept this mild hardship in light of the more significant challenges of those who were here before us. 

Ken radios the tender and we leave this site and travel to the eastern side of the bay, which is part of Devon Island.  The scene is remarkably different here.  An enormous alluvial plain stretches out to the horizon.  Small lakes, created by thawing ice and snow, dot the landscape.  Dry stones give way to soft, squishy bogs, and significantly, to color – lichen, moss, small flowers.  The more you look, the more you see.  “Look small, then look big,” advises Ken, encouraging us to go “macro” first, and then widen our gaze. 

“Musk Ox graze these areas,” Ken continues.  “There is fresh water and food.”  A few minutes later I find a large vertebrae bone which Ken confirms is from a Musk Ox.  “Look on the side of those hills,” he continues.  We strain in to the distance.  “Those brown shapes – there are three of four of them, moving.  They’re musk ox.”  At the end of our walk, Ken stops, and I hear that welcome, “Oh wow!” that I first heard when he stumbled upon the Inuksuk cairn in Admiralty Sound.  He picks up a curved plank of weathered wood and points to the nails protruding from it.  “This is Franklin era shipbuilding technology.  Square headed hand forged nails – either from the Franklin expedition or one of the rescue missions.”  At the end of our walk, I pick up a round stone.  It stands out because every other one of the countless stones on the beach are flat.  Looking at it more closely I see the undeniable impression of coral – “A coral fossil, here??!!” I ask Ken.  “Fossilized brain coral,” he says with a slight smile, “At some point a very long time ago, these may have been more temperate, tropical seas.”  What a day for the Rosehearty team – the ghosts of Franklin, tiny forests, and coral reefs on the 75th parallel of the world.

—Jonathan

Jonathan

Jonathan

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Nanuk

When we got in to the heaviest part, the radar was of little use.  Sea ice stretched out as far as we could see, not as a solid mass but as individual sheets, low and flat, some a few meters long others as large as Rosehearty.  The radar display was jammed with echoes in no discernible order  The location of the ice was forecast correctly on the Canadian ice service chart; the density, however, was not.  Hutch took the helm at 2200, joined by Ethan and our Ice Pilot, Germaine.  On the previous watch, Hugo and I had to contend with a two mile wide section of what are referred to as ice strips.  We had to slow down for a short period, hand steer and pick our lanes through.  But this section of strips was relatively narrow, the strips not so large, and within a half an hour we were back up to speed and in relatively open water. About 45 minutes after Hutch and his team took over, the seascape changed dramatically.  Little by little the open water became more cluttered; lanes narrowed until the ice sheets formed a kind of puzzle, not quite interlocking but, with very little space between them.  From 2200 to 0330 Hutch remained at the helm; Germain backed him up.  Ethan, in his warmest gear, was the lookout on the bow until 0200 and was then relieved by Kiwi Mark.  At 0230 I heard the engines in full astern; the thruster rumbled, a chunk of ice thumped its way down the port side.  Hutch had stopped the boat.  I went topside.  We were only 4 miles from our destination but the lane that Hutch had chosen had disappeared.  At our briefing before setting off from Croker Bay, we had discussed the possibility that we might not be able to make it all the way to our target anchorage at Blanely Bay.  We had just covered 68 of the 72 miles; were we going to have to turn around?  Fortunately another alley was opening, just as the one was closing and so after a short period of moving astern and a bit more bow thruster to swing the head, Hutch had the boat pointed where he wanted and we set off slowly once again.  Rosehearty ghosted out of ice around a low rocky spit and in to our anchorage area.  Clearly relieved, but still operating on a plane of heightened awareness, Hutch gave the order to Mark on the bow, "Let go port anchor, 3 shots lazy brake then, out to 5 on a long stay."  We had made it to Blanely Bay.  Over coffees in the crew mess, Hutch noted, “That was pretty much the upper limit of what this boat and crew would want to contend with.”  With that succinct assessment, he stood up, bade us good night and retired to his cabin.

Hugo and I were left on deck with the boss, who had been on the flybridge most of the night, watching his boat sneak through the floes of sea ice.  The evening cloud had cleared.  The sun blazed, striking the still water, flashing off the few bergy bits that were in the bay.  Off our stern was a stunning glacier, much smaller in width than those we had seen in Croker Bay but impressive in another way: the river of ice was so steep that from the deck we could see not only the face and piled up frontal layers but we also had a view of the entire frozen river from the sea up to the top of the mountain from which it flowed.  The glacier unwound from the mountain top like a wide snake, nestled between the high walls of a dark canyon.  Hoodoos stood guard in perfectly straight rows.  The water in the bay was the color of obsidian. 

And then we spotted her: a lone polar bear crouched on a rocky hill; several walrus were in the water where the rocky spit touched the sea.  The bear had a clear view of the walrus.  And we had a clear view of the bear.  This was our first bear sighting.  The polar bear, Ursus Maritimus or Nanuk in the Inuit language, is the largest of the land carnivores, weighing up to 500 pounds, and, when standing on its hind legs, towering 12 feet above the ground.  One guide book suggested that polar bears may lead the loneliest life of any mammal on the planet.  They meet other bears for courtship only and after that take no further part in family life.  When the anchor tumbled out of the pocket, the polar bear lifted his head, put his nose in the air and took a few deep breaths, then walked slowly down to the water with a lazy, lumbering gate.  He paused to yawn, giving us a glimpse at how wide he could open his jaws.  Catherine had just come on duty and may have been the most excited.  “Ahh’ve never seen a polar bear in my laaf!” she squealed in that crisp and musical Afrikaans accent.  “Oh, maah wurd she is stunning.”  The walrus left.  The bear paused at the water’s edge.  He began to lick the surface gingerly, not plunging his tongue but delicately running it along the surface.  I surmised that there must be a layer of fresh water on the top of the salt water, a thin lens from which the bear could slake his thirst.  Hydrated, the bear entered the water and swam around the small spit and out of sight, leaving us alone with the glacier and the hoodoos of Blanely Bay.

— Jonathan

A tender expedition led by Ken Burton encountered same the bear a few hours later.  I am told that Jerry Herring and several others have some excellent photos that we will post in a few hours.    

Photo by Kiwi Mark

Photo by Kiwi Mark

Photo by Ethan

Photo by Ethan

Photo by Ethan

Photo by Ethan

Photo b y Ethan

Photo b y Ethan

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Photo by Hugo

Rivers of Ice

The Devon Island ice sheet has numerous arms that stretch from the mountainous interior down to the rocky shores.  Rosehearty's project for the day is to visit Croker Bay, a deep fjord just west of Dundas Harbour where two of these glacial arms reach the sea.  We weigh anchor after breakfast and zig zag our way through the dozens of ice bergs that have calved from the faces of these glaciers and are now drifting slowly with the current.  Size and scale became warped as the glacier comes in to view.  I'm on watch with Hugo and am about to slow the engines for what seemed to be our final approach.  Hugo checks the range on the radar and compares it to the Transas electronic chart.

"We're still 5 miles away," Hugo said.  We both check the instruments again because the ice wall looks much closer than that. We press on for another 40 minutes and then stop near the leading edge.  Though only a few hundred meters from where the ice meets the sea, we are still in more than 100 meters of water. 

The river of ice stretches out before us, filling the carved out canyon with its mass.  While Markus keeps Rosehearty on station with engine and thruster, the deck team launches the orange RIB affectionately known as Wolfie.  Crew and guests suit up in their warmest gear and assemble on the port stern quarter, near the shell door.  The call for the day is layers.  Cloudy skies and an icy wind create a bitter cold.    Once everyone has donned life jackets, the call comes from the bridge to open the door and bring the RIB alongside.  Bundled with gear and cameras, everyone steps carefully from the door to the tender.

Wolfie is dwarfed by the glacier, whose face we estimate to be more than 60 meters high.  With Ken providing historical and scientific details, Hugo manoeuvres Woflie right up to the ice edge and then across its entire width.    The ice is blue and white, smeared with rock in some places, translucent in others.  There are giant "teeth" that appear to have been pushed skyward under enormous pressure; there are splits and cracks.  No calving occurs d during the hours we were there.  All is quiet.  We have to remind ourselves that though everything looks static, it is not.  The whole river of ice is sliding towards the sea, its unimaginable weight compacting earth and shearing rock.  It seems invincible.    But we know it is not.  This glacier -- all glaciers -- are melting, in the air and in the water.  Ancient ice meets a warming sea and succumbs. 

— Jonathan

Jerry Herring

Jerry Herring

Jerry Herring

Jerry Herring

Jerry Herring

Jerry Herring

Jerry Herring

Jerry Herring

Jerry Herring

Jerry Herring

Jerry Herring

Jerry Herring

Sacrifices and Sovereignty

Imagine it is the year 1924 and you are a member of the newly formed Royal Canadian Mounted Police.  You've never seen the ocean because you come from  of Saskatchewan, where Grassland covers vast plains in the south and the rugged rocks of the Canadian Shield plateau, coniferous forests, rivers and lakes make up the north.  You are sent to the RCMP detachment at Dundas Harbour, a remote outpost on the largest uninhabited island on the planet, a thousand miles from where you grew up.  Your job, with one other Mountie, is to assert Canadian Sovereignty -- over foreign nations like Denmark and Greenland who may be exploiting the abundant marine resources of Lancaster sound without permission.  You are there to show the flag and collect customs duties or prevent access.  Your commission will last two to three years and your survival will depend on your ability to adapt to this new world as you will have no contact with the outside world until the supply ship reaches you.  The structures you will live in are wood, prefabricated and poorly suited for this environment.  For three months you will have 24 hours of daylight; but for 6 months you will live and work in darkness.  There will be musk ox to hunt and seal.  But marauding polar bears are always a threat and so you will keep your stores well away from your cabins.  You enlist the help of a local Inuit family; they will help you hunt and lead you on far-ranging patrols to the north and west, covering thousands of miles by dog-team.  You survive until the spring of 1926 and you are due to depart that same summer.  But you don't make it to the end of your commission because on June 16 you commit suicide.  You are 26 years old.  Your name is Victor Maisonneuve, Constable 7766.  Less than a year later, your companion, Constable William Robert Stephens will also die, not from suicide but from a gunshot wound during a hunting expedition. 

This is the picture our expedition leader, Ken Burton, paints for us as the Rosehearty team stood on the shores of Dundas Harbour, Devon Island.  A white picket fence surrounds the grave site, which sits at the base of a steep cliff, a gentle slope of crumbling rock edging towards the graves.  Like everything up here in the high Arctic, the bay is vast.  The detachment buildings are dwarfed by the long rocky beach and sheer cliff walls.  There is a small berg stuck on the beach.  A receding glacier forms a backdrop in the adjacent bay.

In 2016 when Rosehearty was here last, the crew saw a Polar Bear.  "It will take me about an hour to clear the area before we can send the group in," Ken explains at the morning briefing.  "I'll start high and work my way down.  I'll radio when to bring everyone in." He’ll carry his 12 gauge shotgun on his shoulder.

The blue ice forms a stark contrast against the red, rocky earth.  Once again we feel like we are either on Mars or in the Grand Canyon, the similarities are so compelling.  "It's funny you should say that," Ken chimes in.  "NASA has established an ongoing research project here."  Intrigued, I went to the NASA website:

NASA's Haughton Mars Project (HMP) is part of an international interdisciplinary field research facility located on the world's largest uninhabited island, Devon Island. This project uses the polar desert setting and harsh climate of the Canadian High Arctic to mimic the environmental conditions that crewmembers are likely to encounter on Mars and other planets.  Devon Island's barren terrain, freezing temperatures, isolation, and remoteness offer NASA scientists and personnel a number of unique research opportunities. Other factors, such as the Arctic day and night cycle and restricted logistics and communications capabilities, offer fitting analogs for the challenges that crewmembers will likely face on long-duration space flights.  In addition to ongoing studies that focus on variables such as communications, equipment testing, and vehicular and extra-vehicular operations, Devon Island is also the site of the Exploration program, which aims to develop new technologies, strategies, and operational protocols geared to support the future exploration of the Moon, Mars, and other planets.

In the Rosehearty crew mess, Renee chuckles at the comparison between yacht crew and space crew on long duration flights. “The last time we were here I couldn’t stop feeling like we were on Mars.  Red rocks, numbing silence.  That’s what I think of when I think of Mars.”

Everyone on board seems to be reflecting on the larger themes – stark beauty, sacrifice in the name of the flag, peaceful isolation or frightening silence.

Photo by Hugo Thomas

Photo by Hugo Thomas

Jonathan

Jonathan

Photo by Jonathan

Photo by Jonathan

Jonathan

Jonathan

Jonathan

Jonathan

Jonathan

Jonathan

Jonathan

Jonathan

Stone Sentinels

On our first full day, we departed Arctic Bay in rain, heading south in Admiralty inlet for a place called The Gallery, which was supposed to have fine examples of something called hoodoos. 

“Have you ever seen a hoodoo?” Mayor Frank had asked me the day before our departure.

“What’s the English word?” I asked.

Frank looked at me smiling, “That is the English word.”

I discovered that Mayor Frank from Arctic Bay, had studied geology.  He would often lapse in to musings about the area. “These islands are mostly composed of sedimentary rock,” Frank explained after recovering from my ignorance about hoodoos, “which is formed from pre-existing rocks eroding and weathering into fine small fragments. Over time, these fine sediments get compacted and cemented together.  In some areas, the sedimentary rock is pushed up and then eroded by wind and water turning the rock into life-like shapes called Hoodoos.” 

As we pushed through curtains of rain and a building breeze, I was eager to visit the Gallery and these hoodoos that lived there.  But in the Arctic, one’s plans are often subject to change.  By the time we were approaching the coast where the hoodoos lived, the wind had risen to 25 knots, blowing straight in to the proposed anchorage, creating a lee shore and difficult landing conditions for the tenders.  And so we opted to explore the other coast, an indentation on the chart called Levasseur Inlet.  No one on board knew anything about this anchorage, not even our expedition leader, Ken Burton.  Uncharted shoals prevented us from getting too close with Rosehearty but both tenders were launched and it was not too long before we had 14 of us plus two very excited dogs on the coarse sandy beach.  Though we had studied the shore with binoculars, we did not accurately understand the scale of what we were about to see.  We found ourselves in a surreal place, where colors, shapes, size and distances were all blurred.  A sweeping glacial plain was flanked on ether side by rolling hills that ended abruptly at steep cliffs.  I had the sense that were in a very wide alley, perhaps canyon would be more accurate. 

Ken proposed a walk, which led us from the beach across the flat plain and up on to a granite step.  The colors under our feet were quite extraordinary.  Tiny shrubs, grass, lichens, even blueberries grew on the damp loamy ground.  The dogs were charged; imagine the thousand new scents that would have bombarded their senses after a morning at sea!  As the flat plain gradually turned in to a gentle ascent.  Ken’s arm went up indicating that we should all pause.  He extended the arm and pointed.  We all peered to the area he was indicating but saw nothing.  We held the dogs on a short leash.  After directing us further, we finally all saw the Arctic hare, well camouflaged and crouching in front of a large craggy rock.  The National Geographic website explains, “Arctic hares are fast and can bound at speeds of up to 40 miles an hour.  In winter, they sport a brilliant white coat that provides excellent camouflage in the land of ice and snow. In spring, the hare's colors change to blue-gray in approximation of local rocks and vegetation.  These hares do not hibernate, but survive the dangerous cold with a number of behavioral and physiological adaptations. They sport thick fur and enjoy a low surface area to volume ratio that conserves body heat, most evident in their shortened ears.” 

“Just walk quietly, we should be able to get a lot closer,” whispered Ken.  He was right.  Despite our numbers, the hare stayed put, unphased by the clicking shutters and the oohs and aahs from our shore posse. 

Atop the granite step, Ken paused and said, “Wow.”  Three stone cairns were positioned on the promontory.  They faced out to sea.  “These are amazing,” said Ken.  “They’re called Inuksuk.”  There was one large and two smaller structures.  “The larger one may have been used for navigation or to mark a particular camp or hunting ground,” Ken explained.   But the two smaller pieces represent family, possibly placed by a descendent of the builder of the original.  These are really exceptional.”  In the Tundra biome, this whole area above the Arctic Circle, there are no trees or other natural landmarks.  These Inuksuk can be visible for great distances.  The word “inuksuk” means “that which acts in the capacity of a human.”  Historically, the most common types of inuksuk are built with stone placed upon stone. The simplest type is a single stone, positioned in an upright manner.  There is some debate as to whether the appearance of human- or cross-shaped cairns developed in the Inuit culture before the arrival of European missionaries and explorers.  We are debating on board as to whether our example had arms.

Standing on the precipice next to the Inuksuk, we take in the view, looking where he is looking – we see the high sides of the canyon blending into the wide plain, which then sweeps into the sea, framing Rosehearty against the grey green waters of Admiralty Inlet.

Photo by Jerry Herring

Photo by Jerry Herring

Photo by Jerry Herring

Photo by Jerry Herring

Photo by Ken Burton

Photo by Ken Burton

The Inuit Flag

The Inuit Flag

Photo by Jerry Herring

Photo by Jerry Herring

All who travel by water

Frank saw the twin engine plane first as it emerged from the clouds, flew passed rust-colored hills, over the village's fresh water lake, and rumbled passed the parking area, engines spitting and coughing.   The aircraft touched down on the brown runway, dragging a plume of fine sand  in its wake, finally taxiing to a stop in front of the terminal, where Captain Hutch, Chief Engineer Richie and I were waiting, accompanied by Mayor Frank and the Hamlet's financial officer Eric, both key local contacts -- now friends -- who have helped us during our brief stay in Arctic Bay.  The plane disgorged its contents -- 10 passengers, plus our Arctic expedition leader, Ken Burton, copious amounts of luggage, boxes and boxes of provisions, and 2 nervous dogs.  The sleepy airport -- there was no one here when arrived an hour earlier -- slumbered to life and all of our gear, as well as the boss and his friends, were whisked from the plane to the armada of waiting vehicles.  Things that we take for granted "down south" are often more problematic here in the high Arctic.  It was only through the kindness and generosity of our hosts that we were able to piece together the number of vehicles required to make this transfer successful.

About two hours before the plane was due, Frank phoned me.  "The taxi van has a blown tire," he said matter-of-factly.  I shuddered.  "And remember I told you it's a holiday weekend, well, one of the drivers of the truck is, shall we say, unable to assist us due to ongoing festivities at his home."  My knees felt a little weak.  A twinge of mild nausea crept in to my stomach. 

"What are our options, Frank?  The boss and his wife, 8 of his friends, our expedition leader and all the gear is arriving in a couple of hours."

"I called Eric from the hamlet office and he says he got the keys to another van.  It was bought by a tour company down south but they lost their manager."

I feel a surge of hope.

"Can a couple of our crew drive your trucks?"

"That shouldn't be a problem."

Crisis averted!

By the time our convoy reached the shore, a few low grey clouds offered some light spits of rain.  But big breaks in the cover, allowed thick shafts of sunlight to strike the surrounding hills and illuminate the red cliffs in a haunting russet hue.

Ethan, Mark, Hugo, and Markus expertly managed the transfer of people and luggage.  The children who have been shadowing us every time we came to shore were on station and tousled with each other to be part of our "bucket brigade" - the line we formed to transfer the boxes and bags from the back of the truck to the waiting tenders.

Great voyages of exploration often begin with ceremony, to ensure the success of the endeavour.  This expedition would be no different.  Captain Hutch had arranged a wonderful surprise for our ship's company.  We all assembled in the aft cockpit, where Frank and his wife Lea, Eric and two young women, dressed in colourful costumes were waiting.  Eric introduced himself and told us a little about the history of Arctic Bay. 

"My wife Lea, was born not far from here.  Her family moved in to Arctic Bay in the late 60's.  Until then, Lea spoke no English," Frank explained.  "The discovery of rich iron ore deposits is what really transformed Arctic Bay.  A mine was opened in the mid-seventies and for a time was very successful.  Quite a few of our locals were trained to work in the mines, which really helped our economy."  Frank fielded a few questions: we learned about ice and hunting and the scourge of alcohol.  He then pointed to the two young women who had accompanied him out. 

“This is Molly Oyukuluk and Inga Mickpa and they are going to share with you the Inuit art of throat singing.”  Molly and Inga stood up shyly.  They faced each other, grasping one another’s arms.  From the depths of Molly's throat, originating deep within her abdomen, emerged a low, guttural sound.  Inga then broke in to a kind of huffing and whooshing sequence, creating a rhythm for Molly to follow.  All of our mouths fell open, as none of us had ever heard anything quite like this before.  Wolfie, the German Shepherd, cocked his head, staring intently and offered a low moan.  He had to be escorted from the cockpit as he was clearly either very interested in joining the performance or agitated by the sounds he heard.

According to the National Geographic website, Inuit throat singing, or katajjaq, is a form of musical performance uniquely found among the Inuit. The traditional form consists of two women who sing duets in a close face-to-face formation with no instrumental accompaniment.  Frank had explained that the art of throat singing was developed for fun and competition among Inuit women while the men were off on hunting expeditions.  Once the duet begins, breath control is essential, as is a steady countenance.  Whichever performer laughs first or runs out of breath at the wrong time loses the game. 

Molly and Inga rock and sway from one foot to the next to keep time.  Growls and raspy cries create a strange hypnotic rhythm.  Molly seemed to create the pattern, leaving silent gaps for Inga to populate with her own rhythmic pattern.  We hear voiced and unvoiced sounds, through inhalation and exhalation.  Molly loses pace first and starts to laugh.  Inga giggles as well.  We join in the laughter too.  We are treated to several rounds, including one called the Walrus.

Frank’s wife, Leah Qaqqasiq, is next to stand.  She is a deacon at the local Anglican church, and a respected Inuit community member.  She has a broad dignified face, that seems connected to a rich, ancient past.  She has brought her red Bible with her.  In the local Inuktitut language, Leah offers a prayer.  The only word we understand is “Rosehearty” but then Leah recites the prayer in English; it is a prayer for a safe voyage and  a bountiful trip.  “Preserve, we beseech thee, all who travel by water, (especially those people for travelling by water in this Rosehearty boat), we pray for them…surround them with thy loving care, protect them from every danger, and bring them in safety to their journey’s end.”

A perfectly timed “Amen” comes from our team, and this Rosehearty adventure is underway.

Jonathan

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